Black Women in the Global Village

Photographed by Jordan Matter of Jordan Matter Photography

Travel and Food blogger Terri of  Try Anything Once speaks with BWLW about her travel adventures, recommends countries that you should consider visiting on your next trip, breaks down the misconceptions about the costs of travel, and reveals her tips for new travelers in this edition of Black Women in the Global Village.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Higher Vegetable Consumption Linked to Fewer Breast Cancer Cases

African-American women who eat more vegetables are less likely to develop estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer, U.S. researchers say.

Continue reading

White House Announces New Chief Usher Angella Reid

The White House is pleased to announce that Angella Reid will serve as the next Director of the President’s Executive Residence and “Chief Usher.” Reid will be the ninth person and first woman to serve in the role. Reid brings to the position 25 years of hotel management experience where she won multiple leadership awards. She will begin in November. The position was most recently held by Rear Admiral Stephen W. Rochon, USCG (Ret.), who departed from the post earlier this year to take a position at the Department of Homeland Security.

Continue reading

The World Mourns the Passing of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Wangari Maathai

NAIROBI, Kenya — Wangari Maathai, the Kenyan environmentalist who began a movement to reforest her country by paying poor women a few shillings to plant trees and who went on to become the first African woman to win a Nobel Peace Prize, died here on Sunday. She was 71.

The cause was cancer, said her organization, the Green Belt Movement. Kenyan news outlets said that she had been treated for ovarian cancer in the past year and that she had been in a hospital for at least a week before she died.

“It is with great sadness that the Green Belt Movement announces the passing of its founder and chair, Prof Wangari Muta Maathai, after a long illness bravely borne,” the organisation said in a statement on its website.

“Prof Maathai passed away on the 26th of September 2011 in Nairobi. Her family and loved ones were with her at the time,” the statement, signed by the movement’s Executive Director Karanja Njoroge, added.

Dr. Maathai, one of the most widely respected women on the continent, played many roles — environmentalist, feminist, politician, professor, rabble-rouser, human rights advocate and head of the Green Belt Movement, which she founded in 1977. Its mission was to plant trees across Kenya to fight erosion and to create firewood for fuel and jobs for women.

Dr. Maathai was as comfortable in the gritty streets of Nairobi’s slums or the muddy hillsides of central Kenya as she was hobnobbing with heads of state. She won the Peace Prize in 2004 for what the Nobel committee called “her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace.” It was a moment of immense pride in Kenya and across Africa.

Her Green Belt Movement has planted more than 30 million trees in Africa and has helped nearly 900,000 women, according to the United Nations, while inspiring similar efforts in other African countries.

Continue reading

Study Shows Women Dominate Men at Social Networking

Women use social networks to connect with their friends, family and colleagues more than men, finds a new survey. Men, however, are more likely to use voice/phone communication than women.

The survey, fielded by Rebtel, focused on expected future use of social media, social media consumption habits and popularity of social media as the choice of U.S. adults if they were to be restricted to one method of communication.

Our findings show that men tend to lag behind women when it comes to communicating with others through social media, which debunks other recent studies that suggest that men are more savvy networkers between the sexes,” says Rebtel CEO Andreas Bernstrom.

Continue reading

Success Tips From Harvard’s First African-American Female MBA

By Lillian Lambert

A few years ago, I spoke at a conference of the African American Student Union, Harvard University. During the question and answer session a young man asked: “Why would someone with a Harvard MBA choose to go into the janitorial business instead of a more sophisticated profession?”

After taking a deep breath I responded. “I admit there is nothing glamorous about my industry. You’re right, it is not an industry where you will find many MBAs, much less a Harvard MBA. But I’ll let you in on a secret: It’s better to own the mop than to push the mop.”

As youngsters, many future entrepreneurs have vivid dreams of being business owners. They envision their product or service and sometimes try their hands as entrepreneurs by creating childish items to sell.

Such was not the case for me. Growing up in a sleepy farming village in Virginia, I never dreamed of being an entrepreneur. Everyone I knew worked for someone else. My unexpected entry into the world of entrepreneurship happened years later, after graduate school.

Getting my MBA from Harvard Business School, I anticipated becoming a corporate executive. Little did I know that corporate America was not breathlessly awaiting the arrival of a young black woman with a Harvard MBA, even if she was the first black woman to get such a degree. Not one corporation recruited me, and I did not rush to seek them out. During the six years after graduation, I held four jobs. From time to time I wondered, “When will I get to use this MBA?”

Continue reading